Health & Fitness This is what sleep deprivation feels like to our brain

09:20  10 november  2017
09:20  10 november  2017 Source:   Netdoctor (UK)

Better Sleep Equals Better Results

  Better Sleep Equals Better Results Rest is a fundamental training principle that will boost your results through the roof. Exercise makes you stronger in the long run but you need enough recovery time, including good sleep quality, to make you fitter and stronger. The Right PatternThe impact of a healthy diet is best experienced with healthy sleep patterns. Not having the recommended seven to eight hours per night can reduce the benefits of a healthy diet. When your body doesn't have enough rest, you will often find yourself feeling a lot hungrier without any energy left over for exercise - a lethal combination.

This show gives you nothing more than a speck of what real sleep deprivation is like . How do we get the little housekeepers in our brains to become more efficient, cleaning up more quickly so we can feel refreshed on even a couple of hours of sleep ?

Sleep deprivation makes trying to power through the day feel like a chore. Here are 7 ways sleep deprivation wrecks your brain , your focus and emotions. Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

Sleep deprivation makes our brain feel like we've drank too much, suggests research © Tara Moore / Getty Sleep deprivation makes our brain feel like we've drank too much, suggests research Ever feel sluggish after a rubbish night's sleep? This could be the tip of the iceberg for our brain function, reveals a new study from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and Tel Aviv University, Israel. Researchers found that a lack of good sleep has severe consequences on our brain function and stops brain cells communicating properly, causing possible lapses in memory and vision.

The team studied 12 participants all with epilepsy. Participants were asked to complete a task, after a period of sleeplessness, whereby the researchers studied the electrical activity in the temporal lobe of the brain. The research found that the sleepier the participant, the more likely they were to find the task challenging and the slower they completed it.

This is the perfect time of day to take a nap

  This is the perfect time of day to take a nap It can boost your productivity, brain power and even your healthThe report by the Sleep Council also suggests there is a perfect time of day to take a nap to reap the maximum benefits. And that time is 3pm.

Sleep deprivation makes our brain feel like we've drank too much, suggests research. You might want to consider this before getting in to your car. More from Sleep better tonight. 20 articles. Drinking cherry juice could help you sleep for an extra 84 minutes a night.

But what does sleep deprivation do to our brains ? Studies have been done that show sleep deprivation causes reduced brain activity across our whole brains , especially in the Thalamus and Prefrontal Cortex. 8 Best Movies about Depression That Show What It Feels Like .

According to Medical News Today, senior study author Dr Itzhak Fried said:

"We discovered that starving the body of sleep also robs neurons of the ability to function properly. This paves the way for cognitive lapses in how we perceive and react to the world around us."

He added:

"Unlike the usual rapid reaction, the neurons responded slowly, fired more weakly, and their transmissions dragged on longer than usual."

Remarkably, the team said that while select regions of participants brains were up and running, some parts were "dozing, causing memory lapses" - essentially acting like they were asleep.

But what does this actually mean? On top of adding to the implications of driving after poor sleep, it seems sleep deprivation needs to be taken more seriously. With Dr Fried even compares sleep deprivation to overdrinking:

If You Don’t Sleep with Socks On, Here’s Why You Should Start Tonight

  If You Don’t Sleep with Socks On, Here’s Why You Should Start Tonight To wear or not to wear—that is, your socks to bed. The controversy over whether or not we’re supposed to wear socks to bed has been debated for years. Fortunately, we have an answer.Sure, those Christmas socks aren’t the most stylish, but keeping your feet warm at night has been proven to actually makes a difference in your sleeping patterns. According to sleep.org, “Heating cold feet causes vasodilation—dilation of the blood vessels—which may tell the brain that it is bedtime. After the blood vessels open in the hands and feet, heat is redistributed throughout the body to prepare for sleep.

But what does sleep deprivation actually do to the brain ? A new study shows that all-nighters are not without neural consequences—some of them potentially longterm. Your brain … well, feels like mush.

What sleep deprivation does to your health. When you have a consistent wake-up time, your brain acclimates to this and moves through the sleep cycle in preparation for you to feel rested and alert at your wake-up time.

"Inadequate sleep exerts a similar influence on our brain as drinking too much… Yet no legal or medical standards exist for identifying overtired drivers on the road the same way we target drunk drivers."

While the study size was small and only looked a people with epilepsy, it's definitely food for thought for when you're tempted to get in your car after a sleepless night.

Struggling to sleep? How to avoid overthinking at nighttime.

The study was published in the journal Nature Medicine.

Related: 25 things you need to know about sleep (provided by Reader's Digest)

Had a Terrible Sleep? Get Someone to Lie to You: It's the ultimate mind trick. A paper published last year in the Journal of Experimental Psychology showed that when students were told they got a good sleep, even if they didn't, they performed better on tests than those who were advised their slumber was truly subpar. 25 things you need to know about sleep

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