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Health & Fitness Worried about childhood obesity? Apparently it runs in the family

19:35  10 june  2018
19:35  10 june  2018 Source:   msn.com

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Worried about childhood obesity ? Apparently it runs in the family . One in four children in Ireland are overweight or obese , which may lead to them being obese adults. Parents also struggle to realise that their children ’s weight is not healthy.

Family . In case you haven't noticed, I write a lot about childhood obesity . It really worries me, especially the insistence by so many parents that it is something that is affecting "other people's kids" and not their own.

a little boy sitting at a table eating food © Associated Newspapers (Ireland) Limited, t/a dmg Media Ireland Childhood obesity is more common in families with a history of obesity, new research has suggested.

Kids whose parents or grandparents suffered from high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol or heart disease are also more at risk of being overweight.

An Italian study has reported on these shocking findings, adding that it’s younger siblings that are more susceptible to obesity than their older brother and sisters.

However, the research can not find why this is the case.

a person holding a birthday cake © Associated Newspapers (Ireland) Limited, t/a dmg Media Ireland Researchers said that there may be a genetic link as to why obesity runs in the family. It could also be due to lifestyle factors, including the inclination to buy fatty foods.

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For my narrowed topic for this research paper I have chosen “ Childhood Obesity Runs in the Family .” The greatest contributor to childhood obesity is the family and how they eat and take care of themselves.

In many families , a child is the identified patient, but the whole family is sick. Scotland is worried about obesity , and does not like single-use plastics. At the same time, the He has been researching and spreading awareness on the childhood obesity epidemic in the US for more than a decade.

Previous research suggests obese children are more likely to suffer from type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure in later life.

However, if their excess weight is shed before adulthood then the risk of these diseases will drop significantly. This means that it’s very important to tackle childhood obesity as early as possible.

One in four children in Ireland are overweight or obese, which may lead to them being obese adults.

Parents also struggle to realise that their children’s weight is not healthy.

Related: Kids Are Fattest In Region With The 'Healthiest' Diet (Provided by Wochit News)

New study shows sugar is dumbing down our children .
The consumption of excess sugar has long been linked to a number of health problems like cancer, diabetes, and obesity, and now a new study has revealed it can affect childhood cognition. The research, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, examined the side effects of consuming large quantities of sugary food and drinks. The study focused on the cognitive development of children whose mothers ate too much sugary foods during pregnancy.

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