Sport Lauda: F1 will "destroy itself" with too much safety

14:40  13 october  2017
14:40  13 october  2017 Source:   readsport.co

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"This was a different era and thank god Formula 1 got much safer that this problem is reduced to nothing and I think it’s good for the sport."[Today] I would not have burned my ear, I would not have damaged myself at all, and I would have 50 times more money.

Это видео недоступно. Niki Lauda : Improving F 1 safety could kill sport. Lauda also says the sport is safe enough and that he fears additional safety measures would reduce fan interest. Want to see more ?

Formula 1 is in danger of ‘destroying itself’ if it becomes too safe says ex-F1 driver and Mercedes executive chairman Niki Lauda.

The Austrian, who raced in F1 for 13 years, has been particularly vociferous about the changes made to safety amid the introduction of the Halo closed cockpit concept implemented into the 2018 regulations.

The device has divided opinion with drivers and fans, and Lauda is concerned fans will lose interest in the sport if it continues to push for safer racing.

“Don’t continue trying to make Formula 1 completely safe because people will lose interest in the end,” Lauda told

“These Formula 1 drivers should be the best drivers in the world. This is what people aim for. People do sometimes like to see accidents to see where the limits are.

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Niki Lauda , irrevocably burnt after an F 1 crash in 1973, believes " too much safety " will destroy the sport.

Niki Lauda , irrevocably burnt after an F 1 crash in 1973, believes " too much safety " will destroy the sport. Lauda warns against " too much safety " – Spanish driver Fernando Alonso suffered a bad crash at the Australian Grand Prix this year.

“But as long they’re able to get out safe, I think this is what we have to achieve. If you go too far, I think Formula 1 destroys itself.”

Dan Mullan/Getty Images Sport © Dan Mullan/Getty Images Sport Dan Mullan/Getty Images Sport

The three-time champion has experienced the inherit dangers of F1 when he almost lost his life in an accident at the Nurburgring in 1976.

Lauda admits if he had the choice, he would have preferred to compete in the modern era of F1.

“The drivers of today, they come with their wife and kids, with the dog, and watch the race because there is no more danger,” he added.

“We were always alone, we didn’t want our wife to come to the race and bring us home in a coffin.

“This was a different era and thank god Formula 1 got much safer that this problem is reduced to nothing and I think it’s good for the sport.

“[Today] I would not have burned my ear, I would not have damaged myself at all, and I would have 50 times more money. I would prefer to race today if I had the option, but I don’t have the option.”

F1 Grand Prix of Great Britain - Qualifying © Dan Mullan/Getty Images Sport F1 Grand Prix of Great Britain - Qualifying

Lauda labels Verstappen penalty as 'worst I've ever seen' .
Niki Lauda has called the decision to award Max Verstappen with a five-second time penalty for exceeding track limits on the last lap of the US Grand Prix as the “worst I’ve ever seen”. The Dutchman was penalised by the stewards for passing Kimi Raikkonen off the circuit on the inside of Turn 17 for third place. The penalty cost the Red Bull driver a podium position after starting down in 16th place following a grid penalty for changing various engine components. Asked his opinion on Verstappen’s penalty, Lauda said: “This decision is the worst I’ve ever seen. He [Verstappen] did nothing wrong. We’re racing drivers, we’re not on a normal road. “It’s ridiculous to destroy the sport with this kind of decision.” The Austrian now believes the matter will now have to be taken to a strategy group meeting for further discussions on how the sport can avoid a similar situation in future races. “Next strategy [group] meeting we need to bring it up to the agenda and start it all over again,” he said. “Because we cannot do that, it’s going too far. “There was nothing to interfere with, it was a normal overtaking.” Due to the Circuit of The America’s large run-off areas, drivers were seen pushing the limits of the track all weekend and Lauda argues the drivers should be allowed to use every inch of track available to them. “Charlie argues all the time there’s white lines and you cannot drive over them,” Lauda added. “Why cannot you drive over white lines if it is possible? Build a wall there if you want. “As long as there is normal circuit, you can use it. A white line is not a limit. We agreed this all, last year it was all agreed. And now we get this decision. I think it’s completely wrong.

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