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UK News Russia hits back as Britain gains support over poisoning of former spy Sergei Skripal

05:25  14 march  2018
05:25  14 march  2018 Source:   abc.net.au

England could pull out of 2018 World Cup over suspected poison attempt in Salisbury, claims Boris Johnson

  England could pull out of 2018 World Cup over suspected poison attempt in Salisbury, claims Boris Johnson Johnson has made the claims if there is a proven link between Russia and the recent Salisbury substance exposureSergei Skripal is in a critical condition and there are suspicions there has been a deliberate attempt to poison him.

Sergei Skripal , 66 moved to Britain in a 2010 spy swap. WHO COULD BE behind the suspected poisoning of former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter? Some experts and opposition voices have pointed the finger at Russia .

Businessman points finger at Putin over Russian spy poisoning . THE poisoning of former Russian spy Sergei Skripal "will be proved" to be a Kremlin plot to assassinate a double agent, businessman Bill Browder alleged.

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Russia row: How will UK respond to spy 'attack'?

  Russia row: How will UK respond to spy 'attack'? The Government has promised a "robust" response if Russia is behind the Salisbury nerve agent attack but what could be imposed on Vladimir Putin's regime?:: Expelling diplomats

Three people remain hospitalized Friday after the poisoning of former spy Sergei Skripal , his daughter Yulia Members of the Falcon Squadron, Royal Tank Regiment, at Winterbourne Gunner, southern England, conducting final preparation and training before deploying in support of the civil

A Russophobic London Guardian report said Putin should be “charge(d) with the attempted murder of Sergei Skripal ” if evidence proves Russian involvement. The Independent headlined “Theresa May under pressure to issue strong measures against Russia over poisoning of former spy ,” saying

Russia has issued a chilling warning after Britain gave it a deadline to answer accusations of involvement in a poisoning attack in Salisbury, but US and EU allies have expressed support for Britain condemning the attack.

Prime Minister Theresa May gave Russia until midnight on Tuesday to explain how a Soviet-era nerve agent was used against a former Russian double agent.

Speaking in an interview on state television, foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova warned: "One should not threaten a nuclear power."

Ms May, who said on Monday it was "highly likely" Russia was behind the poisoning of Sergei Skripal and his daughter, won support from some of Britain's main European allies and the European Union which denounced the attack as "shocking" and offered help to track down those responsible.

Theresa May has accused Russia of being behind the attempted murder of a double agent in the UK

  Theresa May has accused Russia of being behind the attempted murder of a double agent in the UK Britain has formally accused Russia of being behind the attempted murder of ex-spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter with nerve agent on its territory. 

Sergei Skripal , a former officer in Russia 's military intelligence service GRU who was convicted in Russia of spying for Britain , and his adult daughter were found comatose on March 4 in the English town of Salisbury, where he lived after being freed in a 2010 spy swap.

The news comes as a former MI5 official speculated that Russia might have been “framed” over the poisoning of the spy . Annie Machon a former MI5 officer has spoken about accusations Vladimir Putin’s government was directly involved after former Russian spy Sergei Skripal was poisoned on

Ms Zakharova also warned against any possible suspension of Russian broadcaster Russia Today (RT).

"Not a single British media outlet will work in our country if they shut down Russia Today," she said in the broadcast.

With Britain 'all the way'

Donald Trump pushes for tougher gun control laws. © ABC News Donald Trump pushes for tougher gun control laws.

US President Donald Trump said he would condemn Russia if British evidence incriminated Moscow.

In a telephone call with Ms May on Tuesday, he said he was with Britain "all the way", according to a statement from Ms May's office.

France's Emmanuel Macron and Germany's new coalition also expressed solidarity as the UK headed into a showdown with Mr Putin.

Jens Stoltenberg, the secretary-general of the US-led NATO alliance, said the attack was "horrendous".

Russia, however, signalled little likelihood it would respond adequately to London's call for a credible explanation by the deadline.

After spy is poisoned, Britain mulls closing door to London for Russia's rich

  After spy is poisoned, Britain mulls closing door to London for Russia's rich Britain's response to the poisoning of former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal on its soil, using a nerve agent developed by the Soviet Union, could hit members of the Russian elite hard if it closes the door on their London lifestyles. Britain gave Russian President Vladimir Putin until midnight on Tuesday to provide an explanation for the attack, and is due to consider its official response on Wednesday.

The news of former Russian spy Sergei Skripal ’s murder in Wiltshire has raised many questions about the role of double agents. MORE: Britain on the verge of blaming Russia for Salisbury spy attack.

BRITAIN could dramatically step up its military presence on Russia ’s borders as ministers warn the country is facing “a new Cold War” following the poisoning of spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in Salisbury. By Mark Chandler.

Denying it had played any part in the attack, which left the 66-year-old Mr Skripal and his 33-year-old daughter fighting for their lives, Russia said it would ignore the ultimatum until London handed over samples of the nerve agent used and complied with international obligations for joint investigations of such incidents.

Sergei Skripal (L) and Yulia Skripal (R). © AP/Facebook Sergei Skripal (L) and Yulia Skripal (R).

"Any threats to take 'sanctions' against Russia will not be left without a response," the Russian foreign ministry said in a statement. "The British side should understand that."

Russia is in the run-up to a presidential election on Sunday in which President Vladimir Putin, himself a former KGB spy, is expected to coast to a fourth term in the Kremlin.

Mr Skripal, a former officer with Russian military intelligence, betrayed dozens of Russian agents to British intelligence before being arrested in Moscow and jailed in 2006.

He was released under a spy swap deal in 2010 and took refuge in Britain where he had been living quietly in the cathedral city of Salisbury until he and his daughter were found unconscious on a public bench there on March 4.

Russian Diplomats To Be Thrown Out Of The UK In Response To Salisbury Chemical Attack

  Russian Diplomats To Be Thrown Out Of The UK In Response To Salisbury Chemical Attack Russian diplomats are set to be thrown out of the UK in response to the attempted murder of ex-spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter in Salisbury.Theresa May announced on Wednesday afternoon that 23 diplomats have a week to leave the country, making it the single biggest expulsion of diplomats for over 30 years.

Theresa May has come under pressure to plan strong retaliation against Russia over the poisoning of former spy Sergei Skripal , ahead of security talks with the Cabinet and after a fresh warning to people in Salisbury.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov stated that his government is willing to cooperate with an ongoing British investigation into the poisoning of former Russian spy Sergey Skripal and his daughter, Yulia.

A British policeman who went to the aid of Mr Skripal was also affected by the nerve agent. He is now conscious in a serious but stable condition.

May promises 'robust' action

Ms May said on Monday Britain had identified the substance as belonging to the lethal Novichok group of nerve agents developed by the Soviet military in the 1970s and 1980s.

Theresa May © PA Wire Theresa May She and her ministers said Britain would take further "robust" punitive action against Russian interests — beyond sanctions already in place — if Mr Putin did not come up with a credible explanation of events.

Speaking to reporters at the White House, Mr Trump acknowledged the British charges of involvement against Russia, but said he needed to talk to Ms May before rendering a judgment.

"As soon as we get the facts straight, if we agree with them, we will condemn Russia or whoever it may be," said Mr Trump, who earlier fired Secretary of State Rex Tillerson after a series of policy rifts, said.

"It sounds to me like they believe it was Russia, and I would certainly take that finding as fact."

While trade figures show Russia accounts for less than 1 per cent of British imports, London is of major importance for Russian companies seeking to raise capital, and since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union has become the Western capital of choice for many Russian business leaders.

Moscow says will retaliate soon to Britain's expulsion of diplomats

  Moscow says will retaliate soon to Britain's expulsion of diplomats Moscow on Wednesday called Britain's decision to expel 23 Russian diplomats over the poisoning of an ex-spy a sign that London was choosing confrontation with Russia, adding that retaliation would follow shortly. "The British government made a choice for confrontation with Russia," the Russian foreign ministry said in a statement.

The Independent: Sergei Skripal : Former double agent may have been poisoned with nerve agent over 'freelance' spying , sources say. #65 There we go Britain to raise Sergei Skripal poisoning case with Nato allies.

DS Nick Bailey is seriously ill in hospital having visited the home of Sergei Skripal after the former Russian spy and his daughter, Yulia, were found slumped on a bench in Salisbury, Wiltshire, on Sunday afternoon.

Britain could call on allies for a coordinated Western response, freeze the assets of Russian business leaders and officials, expel diplomats or launch targeted cyber attacks.

It may also cut back participation in the football World Cup which Russia is hosting in June and July.

The expression of solidarity from the EU came despite tensions over British preparations to quit the bloc next year.

The EU imposed travel restrictions and asset freezes against 150 people and 38 companies in response to Russia's annexation of Crimea from Ukraine.

EU nationals and companies are also banned from buying or selling new bonds or equity in some state-owned Russian banks and major Russian energy companies.

But diplomats in Brussels said, despite sharing Britain's anger, the bloc is unlikely to have much stomach for imposing additional sanctions on Russia since attributing the nerve attack to Moscow was difficult and keeping existing economic sanctions going was proving a strain.

Ms May said on Monday Russia had shown a pattern of aggression including the annexation of Crimea and the murder of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko, who died in 2006 after drinking green tea laced with radioactive polonium-210.

Moscow denied any responsibility for that murder despite the findings of a public inquiry which said it had probably been approved by Mr Putin.

Pictures: Which countries are allies and which are enemies?

Which countries are allies and which are enemies?: <p><strong>Geopolitics</strong> is complicated, especially in the unpredictable landscape created by the end of the <strong>Cold War</strong>, the rise of non-state global actors like the <strong>Islamic State</strong>, and the uncertainty created by <strong>Brexit</strong>, the election of <strong>Donald Trump</strong>, and the growing influence of ultranationalism. On the global scene, who can trust whom? Which countries are <strong>allies</strong> and which are <strong>enemies</strong>? Our slideshow provides a brief primer.</p> Which countries are allies and which are enemies?

Weapons inspectors examine Salisbury poison .
Inspectors from the world's chemical weapons watchdog have begun examining the nerve agent used to poison ex Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia. Experts from the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) are carrying out tests on samples taken from Salisbury at the Ministry of Defence's military research facility at Porton Down, according to sources.Mr Skripal, 66, and his 33-year-old daughter remain in a critical but stable condition in Salisbury District Hospital, Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust said.The pair were found collapsed in the centre of the Wiltshire town two weeks ago.

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